Energy Efficiency – Potential Household Savings in Sweden

In a recent report we analysed the savings potential of the Swedish housing sector. Sweden has committed herself to save some 12.8 Mtoe of primary energy up to 2020. Taking into account that the country used some 51.4 Mtoe in 2010, and with a consumption goal in 2020 of about 41 Mtoe, this means that savings of some 20 % within the remaining decade are at stake.

One of the biggest savings potentials is supposed to be hidden in the building stock. Household energy use accounts for 23 % of the total final energy consumption in Sweden and the largest part of it is eaten up by heating purposes. In the following we look into the consumption figures for heating and warm water in Swedish households. The raw data for our investigation have been taken from Eurostat, Statistics Sweden and the Swedish Energy Agency.

The average energy consumption in kWh/sqm according to year of construction is distributed as follows:

Fig. 1 Average annual energy consumption for heating and warm water in Sweden.

The latest construction types use significantly less energy per sqm than the older ones. This is in line with our expectations. For single dwellings average consumption has dropped by some 40 % from 153 kWh/sqm to 91 kWh/sqm. For multi-dwellings the decrease was not as dramatic. Nevertheless, average consumption went down from its maximum value of 170 kWh/sqm to 125 kWh/sqm (26 %).

The consumption figures per category are displayed in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 Energy consumption for heating and warm water by year of construction.

Taking the latest construction technology as a reference, we may calculate how much energy could be saved if the entire building stock was refurbished according to that standard. The results are shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 Calculated savings potential by year of construction.

As regards the single housing sector refurbishing the oldest part of it would account for 50 % of the total savings potential of that sector. Obviously, the younger part of the building stock would only contribute very little (2 %) to the entire potential.  In total, we could expect to save some 9.9 TWh for single dwellings and 5.5 TWh for multi-dwellings. Thus the entire savings potential from the housing sector would amount to 15.4 TWh which corresponds to 24 % of all energy used for heating and warm water.

This is an impressive number although in terms of Mtoe its equivalent is a mere 1.3 Mtoe. Thus we may conclude that renovating the Swedish housing stock would provide savings of about 10 % of the entire reduction goal set by the Swedish government (12.8 Mtoe). Having said that we have to admit that the biggest part of the task is still to be done.

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