Energy and Transport

Transport is one of the big consumers of energy. As we have seen in some of my previous posts, there is a clear tendency to become more energy efficient. Does this also apply to energy used for transport purposes?

Eurostat provides a collection of data on this issue which may give us an answer.  Let us look at the transport energy per unit of GDP. This is certainly a sensible measure since we may consider a link between economic activity on the one hand and transport (of both people and goods) on the other. So whenever the economy is growing (or shrinking) transport is likely to follow suit.

We consider here the case of Germany, France and UK, i.e. the biggest economies of Europe. The figure below shows how energy demand for transport per unit of GDP has developed since 1995. The curves are indexed with 2005 = 100.

Energy demand for transport purposes per unit of GDP.

The message behind this figure seems to be obvious. Over the past 15 years there has been a certain decoupling of economic performance and energy demand for both passenger and goods transport. Thus per unit of GDP less energy is used for transport. We are becoming more energy efficient.

Having a closer look at the figure we may also observe that the downward trend is still unbroken, i.e. there is no flattening tendency. This leads us to the conclusion that there is room for further improvement of energy efficiency in the transport sector.